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to the class and she said students i have terrible news. president kennedy has been shot but he is still alive. take out your rosaries and let's pray for the president. back in those days rosaries were standard operating equipment in the catholic classroom so we all took out our rosaries. we were saying and holding each beat for dear life in maybe 20 minutes later or so she had to go out in the hall and she came back and she was crying. we knew. it was over. >> host: where was the school? >> guest: norfolk virginia saint pius the x. they will kill me if i don't mention it. i remember everything about it. i remember, and everybody was crying. i went to my locker's a good friend of mine was cleaning out his locker for the weekend because the next week is thanksgiving. the odd thing is that i guess he would have to be in catholic school at the time to understand that i remember saying to my friend, he is the only catholic president he didn't live to finish out his term. that's the way we looked at it back then. i was seven when kennedy ran for president and i was so excited. it was the eighth sac
when kennedy ran for president. was so excited. it was the eight sacrament to be for john f. kennedy. at passed out literature in my neighborhood about it. i remember a woman slamming the door and saying, i don't support papist to be added not know what that was. it was a big deal to us. there was a lot of anti-catholic prejudice. >> i was seven at the time, but i have a very vivid memory of our principal walking into our second grade class from at band nine school in silver crews, new york. only two things i remember after that was when i got home, standing on the coffee table and my father holding me while i was crying and the drums. and then on sunday, on the tv and watching live oslo being shot by ruby. what got you interested in politics? >> guest: honestly, john f. kennedy did. that is one reason why i did the book. i have always had it in the back of my mind. i wanted to write about this once the had the time and resources to do it. we tried, we are doing a big project on kennedy. the book is a five-year project. that is why it 600 pages. if you give an academic another year h
and his new book "the kennedy half-century." the university of virginia politics professor explores the legacy of the kennedy administration knowing how each successive president has used his image to further his own agenda. the program is about an hour. >> host: larry "the kennedy half-century" is a marvelous achievement. where were you on november 22, 1963? >> guest: i was 11 years old. i was in catholic elementary school, sixth grade. i had a wonderful sister a nun sister roberta miriam and sometime in the early afternoon a knock at the door came and that was rare. back in those days you were not interrupted in class. she went to the door and i heard her gasp. she placed her hand up against her chest. she came back to the class and she said students i have terrible news. president kennedy has been shot but he is still alive. take out your rosaries and let's pray for the president. back in those days rosaries were standard operating equipment and the catholic classroom so we all took out our rosaries and we were holding each bead for dear life. maybe 20 minutes later or so she had
terrible news. president kennedy has been shot but he's stil he is still alive. take out your rosaries and we will pray. rosaries were standard operating equipment so we took out our rosaries and we were holding each bead for dear life and i don't know maybe 20 minutes later or so she had to go out and thinthe hallway and came bad she didn't have to tell us anything. she was crying and we knew. >> do you remember that weekend at all? >> guest: i remember everything about it. we were all upset. and i went to my walkers. a good friend of mine because the next week was thanksgiving and the odd thing you have to be at catholic school at the time to understand but i remember seeing to my friend he was the only catholic elected president and he didn't live to finish out his term and that's the way that we looked at it back then. i was seven when he ran for president and i was so excited. it was the eighth sacramento bee for john f. kennedy and i passed out literature in my neighborhood. i remembered a woman slamming the door and saying i don't support a papist. i didn't know what that was th
is his name. behind the car is mrs. kennedy and members of the immediate family. in the other cars as well. and the others the cortÈge has halted not ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ the wind is rustling the flag that drapes the casket. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [patriotic music] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [patriotic music] ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> as the years go by, there is a significant tradition on this splendid street. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> an olive branch in one hand and the arms of war and another. during i think what was the truman administration, he ordered it returned for the olive branch and that's the way it is today. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> marching in front of the military cortÈge. special armed forces, paratroops come actually. ♪ ♪. back onto pennsylvania avenue, the white house, one block away. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪
>> rose: welcome to the program. tonight, 50 years after the assassination of president kennedy in dallas we remember and assess his legacy with robert dallek, jeff greenfield, richard reeves, michael beschloss, and jill abramson. >> among the many thing he is did politically-- and i think he was a relatively good president-- the fact of the matter is, the most important thing about him-- partly because of his health-- is that he did not wait his turn. he destroyed the system that would not have made him president. he didn't wait his turn and now in america no one does. >> put aside all the myth, put it all aside, this was somebody who excited and aroused the country to a kind of civic interest that i think would not have happened had he not been president. >> rose: we conclude with clint hill, the secret service agent who climbed aboard the presidential limousine as it sped to parkland hospital with the dying president. >> i still have a sense that that we had a responsibility to do that day st. we failed in that responsibility. the way i was brought up was that if you have a j
25 marks the 50th anniversary of president kennedy's state funeral. we will now bring you nbc's coverage, including the procession from the u.s. capitol to the white house. the mass at saint matthews cathedral, and the burial service at arlington national cemetery. we are on the steps of the capitol. there's is a huge crowd that has gathered. the watch is almost over. van is about to play hail to the chief. the casket will be brought down. the family is looking into the rotunda. a very quiet crowd. they are paying their last respects now. -- thed morning air cason will roll to arlington national cemetery. -- will notice in the crowd they are conscious that there is a television camera on them. you will see no waves. i saw one. there always tends to be just one. this day of mourning is reaching it's final act. feeling.only one just one. shared by all of us. let's go back to the studio. that from jack on the steps of the capitol. thing,n incredible beginning with the tragedy and the assassination. that seems aftermath like a mad unraveling. in chicago, a man turned to his wife a
with wings of eagle and run and not be weary. finally, in his last hours, president kennedy had prepared these words for dallas and for the nation, the rich -- righteous of our clause must always underlie our strength. for as was written long ago, accept the lord, guard the city, the guard watches in vain. the following is one of his favorite passages from scripture from the book of aclose -- the third chapter. there's an appointed time for everything, and a time for every affair under the heaives. d "issue" heavens. a time to be born, and a time to die, a time to plant and a time to uproot the plant. a time to kill, and a time to heal. a time to tear down and a time to build. a time to eat and a time to laugh. a time to mourn and a time to dance. a time to scatter stones and a time to gather them. a time to embrace and a time to be far from embraces. a time to seek and a time to lose. a time to keep and a time to cast away. a time to rend and a time to sow. a time to be silent and a time to speak. a time to love and a time to hate. a time of war and a time of peace. and now as the final
very much. >> top down is the name of the book and novel of the kennedy assassination joining us on a tv is author jim lehrer. and novel about the kennedy assassination. >> that's right. it's based on an experience i had on november 22, 1963. i was a reporter with the afternoon newspaper in dallas that i had an experience on that day has to do everybody else who was involved not elena coverage but just involved with that day. he kind of stuck in my head in my craw for 50 years. i used it as a seed for a novel which is about the bubble top over whether it was or was not at any given time on the presidential limousine that day and what consequences that might have had and the secret service agent who was overcome by guilt ,-com,-com ma fictional secret service agent overcome by guilt over what happened that day. >> are you featured in the book as a reporter? >> some people have suggested that. and narrator is a reporter and i was a dallas newspaper reported. on that day he didn't do exactly what i do with some modifications but after that its strict lee fiction. sure it's based on
historian explores rose kennedy's contributions to and influence over her famed family dynasty. this program is about an hour. >> host: barbara perry it's good to be here with you talking about the kennedys. but that is having grown up catholic i think the kennedys have the particular resonance for us but i wanted to start right off in ask you, you're a supreme court presidential scholar. how did you get interested in rose? >> guest: i've been interested in the kennedy family since i was a little tyke read when i was four years old my mother to me and my brothers to downtown louisville. she piled the center 56 chevrolet and drove us downtown to the courthouse. she was completely drawn to this new candidate on the scene in the presidential race senator john f. kennedy. >> host: do you think because he was catholic a little bit? >> guest: i have to think i that was a major part of it in addition to which he was about her age so she was the new generation to which the torch was being passed that i point out what she loved history and politics she wasn't as active in grassroots politics and didn
television provider. >> coming up, coverage of the funeral of president john f. kennedy on the 50th anniversary and then a bipartisan meeting and then a panel on nuclear energy. >> the companies have notice how mrs.nixon was looking at a pack mg of cigarettes and admired the pandas at the zoo and they said they will have them going home with you. it was important to be there. and evidence at the end of the trip are where news report came out and they would talk about the president that way and say what a wonderful job nixon did. >> pat nixon tonight live. >> next a portion of the john f. kennedy funeral. broadcast on november 25, 1963. it will have the footage of the family going with the casket through the streets and it concludes at the burial site. >> we are on the steps of the capital. and as i look across at the huge crowds that have gathered, the navy broadband -- band is -- about to play hail to the chief and the casket is brought down. a quite crowd. one paying their very last respects and waiting patiently in the cold morning air. the casket is rolling to arlington cemetery
forget it. 50 years ago november 22, 1963 president john f. kennedy was assassinated by gunfire as he road through his motorcade through dallas, texas. president kennedy was 46 years old. 35th president of the united states. three years into his one and only presidential term. president kennedy's funeral was marveled that after another assassinated president. abraham lincoln. the protocal was chose by his widow. the casket was drawn by horses down pennsylvania avenue to the capitol building where jackie, caroline and john jr. were waiting. john jr. famously saluted his father. a symbolic force to st. matthew's cathedral where funeral services were held. president kennedy was buried in arlington national cemetery where an eternal flame burns apt his grave site. question, what is the legacy of the kennedy presidency? >> john was young, made for the television age. had a wonderful sense of humor. he was an inspirational figure. what sered the soul of america was us watching the horrible way he died. the race to the hospital. taken in the casket to washington, d.c. the whole funeral and s
that unites us. >> jacqueline kennedy's 1000 days as first lady was defined by images, young mother, advocate for the arts, fashion icon. footage of the assassination of president kennedy and his funeral cemented her in the public consciousness. welcome to the c-span series, first ladies, influence and image. we have two guests at the table, to tell you more about her story. he has a special focus on the cold war era and the kennedy administration. robert parry is a political scientist and as part of the modern first ladies series, he has written the jacqueline kennedy biography. before we get into more details about her white house years, i want to talk about the images of that assassination. anyone who was alive at that time has those images in their mind. this is a collective consciousness. she was just 34 years old. >> just 34 years old. we know so much about this story. he was shot and into her arms, for five minutes they were there and she felt that they left the hospital to go back to washington, but they had to do something to make sure that he had the historical reputation. >> what w
forget it. 50 years ago, november 22, 1963, president john f. kennedy was assassinated by gunfire as he drove in his motorcade through dealey plaza in dallas texas. he was 43 years old. three years into his one and only presidential term. president kennedy's state funeral was modeled after that of another assassinated president. abraham lincoln. the president's flag draped casket was drawn by horses down pennsylvania avenue from the capitol building to the white house where wife jackie and son john jr. was waiting. john jr. saluted his father in a heartbreaking moment. the family walks with a military escort. the funeral service was held at the cathedral. president kennedy was buried at the arlington cemetery where the eternal flame burns. question, what was the legacy of the kennedy presidency? pat buchanan? >> well john f. kennedy was young, charismatic, made for the television age. a wonderful sense of humor, an inspirational figure. i think what seared the soul of america for all of us watching the horrible way he die and the race to the hospital and taking the casket to washington
tonight. "the assassination of president kennedy" a cnn special, starts right now. >>> in the average man's life there are two or three emotional experiences burned into his heart and his brain. and no matter what happens to me i will remember november the 22nd as long as i live. >> there has been an attempt on the life of president kennedy. >> they are combing the floors of the texas book depository building to find the assassin. [ gunshots ]. >> oswald has been shot at point blank range fired into the stomach. >> police are working to the assumption oswald's murder was to shut him up. >> the element of a simple intelligence agency killed john kennedy. >> the story has been suppressed. witnesses have been killed. we have a right to know who killed our president and why he died. >> i stand here tonight on what was once the last frontier. the pioneers gave up their safety, and sometimes their lives to build our new west. beyond that frontier, are uncharted areas of science and faith, unsolved problems of peace and war -- promise of ignorance and prejudice. but i believe the times require i
to japan, caroline kennedy, is touring areas affected by the 2011 disaster, saying her country will continue to offer support. >>> chinese officials find themselves at the center of a diplomatic dispute. over the weekend, they announced that they'd set up an air defense identification zone over the east china sea. that drew immediate criticism from japan, south korea, and the u.s. and now the chinese are criticizing the americans for how they've reacted. the zone includes air space over the senkaku islands. japan controls the islands, china and taiwan claim them. in terms of international law, japanese officials launched a protest and u.s. officials said they were deeply concerned. now china's foreign ministry has released a statement criticizing the americans for taking sides. the document urged them to stop making irresponsible remarks. the document says the chinese launched a protest with u.s. ambassador gary locke. officials from the chinese defense ministry launched another protest with the u.s. military atash sha, they said the americans' comments could encourage japan to
getting a nuclear weapon. politics does play a role. >> well, kennedy used to say politics can get politically but in foreign policy can kill you. more important on foreign policy. to see ken mccarthy say he would hope the politics didn't get involved. senator from texas on the republican side said his first reaction on twitter was, it's amazing what the administration will do to deflect from obamacare which gives you some sense of the super charged nature of this feeding in to the original domestic debate over the president's health care plan. the approval rating is low and on the question of question there's been a case in the past where president's approval rating has gone very low like during 2011 debt ceiling debate they still trusted him. that's not the case here. in our poll last september, now only 49% of the country say they trust him. that makes everything harder for him. the big date to watch of course he's got one more week to deliver on this promise health care website will work. that's important not only they need to get people out there and signed up but also another
it for answers. first must come the answers to the two great overriding questions. who killed john f. kennedy? the commission answered unequivocally lee harvey oswald. was oswald acting alone or was he a member of the conspiracy? the commission answers he acted alone. >> we knew most people were not going to read all of the warren commission report. so cbs news wanted to bring to air an understandable form for the public at large what the warren commission found. >> there was nothing to support the speculation that oswald was an agent, employee or informant of the fbi or the cia or any other governmental agency. >> oswald owned the murder rifle, a mail order purchase slip for that rifle was in his handwriting. oswald's palm print was found on a surface of the gun. >> the media had all concluded that this was the most exhaustive investigation, case closed. oswald did it alone. >> the commission concludes that three shots were fired. all of them from this sixth floor window in the texas school book depository. >> the cumulative evidence of eyewitness, firearms and ballistic experts and medical
that an unauthorized biography gives me a better chance. >> host: knowing what you know about jackie kennedy, john kennedy. if you had known that, would you vote for john kerry for president, again knowing what you know now? >> guest: knowing what i know now and knowing what i know now about richard nixon, yes, i would vote for john f. kennedy. not simply because my last name is kelley. that would not have been the reason. i would vote for john f. kennedy based on the speech he gave in june of 1963 when he talked about civil rights and he introduced civil rights legislation. i think that speech ennobled his presidency. and his presidency was flawed. the cuban missile crisis, the step up in vietnam. but what he said on civil rights to me was a shining moment. he taught about civil rights is a moral right, as something that's clear is the constitution and the soul of the scriptures. that night, after he gave that speech, his popularity went from 60% to 47% like that. ebbers was murdered that night. john f. kennedy went into the presidency as most presidents do, thinking foreign policy is going to be
at home. >> when "america tonight" continues - cam lot and civil rights. what leg as si did kennedy leave behind. >> it's been 50 years since the assassination of john f. kennedy. he's remembered for his sudden death on the day in dallas texas and his fleeting presidency. we wanted to look at one of the momentous things he did. five months before that day kennedy gave a stirring civil rights address from the oval office, sewing the seeds for one of his biggest legacies, the ground breaking civil rights act. >> america tonight spoke to many about how kennedy made the speech and a cause he was somewhat reluctant to embrace. >> i can understand that martyrdom elvates anyone. and the nature of his death as a sacrifice to all of us lifted him up. but at the same time i couldn't understand why so many people elevated him as highly as he did. he was a good figure, but not a great figure and was disappointing in many ways. >> a lot think he's the second freight eplans ipator, speaking of him in the same breath as abraham lincoln. he doesn't deserve the mantel. >> kennedy was not a righteous perso
lot and civil rights. what leg as si did kennedy leave behind. the stream is uniquely interactive television. in fact, we depend on you, your ideas, your concerns. >> all these folks are making a whole lot of money. >> you are one of the voices of this show. >> i think you've offended everyone with that kathy. >> hold on, there's some room to offend people, i'm here. >> we have a right to know what's in our food and monsanto do not have the right to hide it from us. >> so join the conversation and make it your own. >> watch the stream. >> and join the conversation online @ajamstream. >> it's been 50 years since the assassination of john f. kennedy. he's remembered for his sudden death on the day in dallas texas and his fleeting presidency. we wanted to look at one of the momentous things he did. five months before that day kennedy gave a stirring civil rights address from the oval office, sewing the seeds for one of his biggest legacies, the ground breaking act. >> america tonight spoke to many about how kennedy made the speech and a cause he was somewhat reluctant to embrace. >>
lot and civil rights. what leg as si did kennedy leave behind. >> evey weeknight on al jazeera america change the way you look at news tune into live news at 8 and 11 >> i'm john seigenthaler and here's a look at the headlines.. >> infomation changes by the hour here... >> our team of award winning journalists brings you up to the minute coverage of today's events... then, at 9 and midnight. america tonight goes deeper with groundbreaking investigative coverage of the nation's top stories... >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you... >> live news at 8 and 11 eastern followed by america tonight on al jazeera america there's more to it. consider this: the news of the day plus so much more. >> we begin with the government shutdown. >> answers to the questions no one else will ask. >> it seems like they can't agree to anything in washington no matter what. >> antonio mora, award winning and hard hitting. >> we've heard you talk about the history of suicide in your family. >> there's no status quo, just the bottom line. >> but, what about buying shares in a professional athlete?
. >> a salute to president john f. kennedy. 50 years ago today the funeral, the nation said good-bye. we'll share the story behind one of the most enduring images from that dark day. >> good day i'm andrea mitchell in washington. the nuclear deal with iran reached over the weekend is the culmination of months of negotiations. those negotiations lasted longer than many people knew. according to a report by "associated press" which first broke this story, obama administration has been in secret back channel talks for many months. at least five high-level meetings have taken place since march paving the way forth agreement signed in geneva. joining me deputy security adviser. thank you for being with us today. tell me about back channel talks. they were done without most of our allies knowing, certainly without israel knowing and saudis. what was the reason for these secret negotiations? >> andrea, we've said all along that we would welcome opportunities to have direct contact with iran. over the years whether it's at the united nations through ambassador and other conversations. we said we
of power without seeming to take over. because of the image of pushing the kennedys out of the way. had to be very, very careful. lyndon johnson was very lucky that yet lady bird to help them with that. she had a good year for knowing what exactly to say and when to say it. >> in particular, what did she do in those first weeks? >> she said she felt onstage for a part she never rehearsed. in fact, i think it would be hard to find a first lady better prepared than she was. she started taking notes while she was waiting to hear if president kennedy had died. on the way back, she made plans to put their radio station into a blind trust so they would not be accused of profiting from it. she took over very fast. she was a good study. >> i want to lay off that idea. that was an administration that documented itself extensively. there was a daily diary that which she recorded herself. there were the lyndon johnson phone tapes -- >> fabulous. >> there was also a naval television crew that documented them. was this new to the administration or had this been going on a while? >> i think the amoun
this very ho? at 8:00 p.m. eastern time in the body of john f. kennedy was in shington for an autopsy that would drag on for hours. but still ultimately lead more questions than answers. think about where we were as a nation at this very moment coming half century ago. it might even lead to war. concerns that no one was safe and the reality that all innocence was off. fifty years ago this minute, a grieving jacqueline kennedy was being peppered with plans for a state uneral. this night she would mention camelot being lost and a martyr was on. it was sadly all coming together at this hour on this day and that includes every major global leader converging on our nation's capital with a horse-drawn carriage that had plastered abraham lincoln with through the same streets. she waited to take her husband homene last time and a new era. the the reality of all this heading home this hour on this night for a country that would be fixated on nothing else these next few days. a friday night then as it is w. but as different as night and day. that is why we are breaking to understand the brave f
compared the kennedy years in the white house to camellot. that's coining a phrase that endured to describe jfk's presidency. >> she was the person who created this image of her husband and his presidency that hadn't existed before the assassinati assassination. >> in the years that followed, jackie carried on in her husband's memory. in 1967, she and daughter caroline and son john christened the uss john f kennedy. but what she did next shocked those who expected her to be a kennedy for life. >> she married aristotle onassis and it was the biggest standcan at the time. >> when bobby kennedy was assassinated in 1968, jackie needed the security that only onassis could provide. they married in october of that year. >> when bobby kennedy was assassinated they said oh, my god, they're killing kennedys and my children are the number one target. well, ari could protect their children. they were very much in love at the beginning. but it soured eventually. in 1973 when aristotle onassis' son alexander was killed in a tragic plane crash, he blamed it on jackie. he felt jackie was bad luck. he began
on those pages. >> there were recordings before this. we have some kennedy recordings. we have roosevelt recordings. john quincy adams's wife wrote when she was first lady, "the autobiography of a nobody." i think that most first couples have an awareness of the magnitude of the job. lady bird johnson had such a sense of history that she understood. she said she dared herself to be productive. >> throughout this program we will see some of the video from the naval crew that followed her around to document her days in the white house. we will start with one of those. this is lady bird johnson in 1963, recording that first, tragic day that brought them into the white house. >> one leg of mrs. kennedy was almost entirely covered in blood. her right glove was caked with her husband's blood. she always wore gloves. that was somehow one of the most poignant sights -- exquisitely dressed and caked in blood. i asked her if i couldn't get somebody to come in to help her change and she says, oh no, that is all right. perhaps later i will ask mary gallagher but not right now. for a person that gen
in this $13 billion payout? >>> and as the country commemorates the 50th anniversary of the kennedy assassination we will examine new evidence of a castro connection. and welcome to "the journal editorial report." i'm david asman in for paul gigot. the obama administration admitted it won't meet its own deadline to get obama care up and running. kathleen sebelius saying it is a work of constant improvement. how in the world will supporters of obama care defend the new laws as the deadline comes and goes and as those policy cancellations keep rolling in? particularly as they head home and mingle with a lot of unhappy constituents during the thanksgiving and christmas holidays something republican senator marco rubio says may be a game changer. >> it has to be refield. how long will it take for democrats to realize and cooperate? so far i think at the upper echelons of the democratic party they're being stubborn bit. my prediction, check back in eight week. >> joining the panel "wall street journal" columnist dan headinger and james freeman. dan, quite a sight. when lawmakers go home,
at the life and death of president john f. kennedy in recognition of the 50th anniversary of his assassination in dallas on november 22nd, 1963. and now a panel of firsthand accounts on the assassination and its aftermath. panelists include hugh ainsworth who was reporting for the "dallas morning news" when the president was shot, dr. alan childs who was at parkland memorial hospital when president kennedy arrived, and howard will lets, the only living member of the warren commission. this panel, from the 2013 texas book festival in austin, is about 40 minutes. >> okay. my name is charles, i'm the book's editor, and we are supposed to have three gentlemen here. hugh is running late, apparently, so we're going to go ahead and get started since this is being televised. but hugh ainsworth, who was the reporter who was on the scene when kennedy was killed in deally plaza in 1963, to my far left is alan childs who was at parkland hospital when kennedy arrived there. and he has written a book, an oral history of those people who were there. and then to my immediate left is howard willens. he was one
.s. government from president kennedy in particular and president john johnson made it their job to lobby to lobby with television and directives to shape the image coming out of vietnam and because of the nature there was never a declared war and there was a limited engagement beginning with advisors and then american troops and smaller groups finally becoming a large army of half a million. and this was never a conflict in which the u.s. government felt that it could impose the kind of censorship that was common in world war ii and korea and in that censorship, the journalists would be obligated to run photographs and written material and also publishers at home would be expected to take a patriotic look at what was going on or in overseas commitment. so when i go in 1962, i was joined by a group of american journalists who were very unique at that time. all of them graduates from ivy league universities and probably the first to actually enter the cross of news reporting and they took it as a much more pragmatic approach as to what was going on in vietnam, and it covered the civil righ
on residents. now the governor of okinawa once knew he appointed us ambassador to japan. caroline kennedy to help deal with the bases issue. he'll cause an outcry in the men's kennedy at her official residence in tokyo. looking out the factual officials said. open up a month old kennedy that japan and the us should handle the bases issues seriously. but the officials said not claiming kennedy did not discuss the fatalities relocation plan. the finals last kennedy to visit. okie now want to hear from local residents first hand. kennedy reportedly said she wants to visit ocala and that still trying to help resolve the basis it should. the new session of tokyo's metropolitan assembly is often contentious stock dove in nlp deal says expected to face harsh grilling for receiving a large amount of money from a company that's been tainted by political scandal and a steel bolts me going the skull up as the story governor you know cent admitted to accepting about five hundred thousand dollars to ship by a major hospital three. several executive members of completion i were arrested this month for
'll be on tomorrow night. tonight is tom brokaw. both talking about the assassination of john f. kennedy. too snoon. [laughter] a little while back on the program i personally don't watch it, i think it's crash. [ laughter ] i may have mentioned something about chicago-style pizza and how it tended to be less pizza-ish than pizza. i was guest tick laying quite a bit during that clip. in articulating that sentiment, i may have implied that deep dish pizza tastes like a string cheese that had been baked for two hours inside of mike ditka's ass. [ laughter ] so i said that on a -- my program and apparently chicago has television. [laughter] >> things things are taking offo the "the daily show" host's jon stewart rant against our deep dish pizza. >> jon stewart trashing our pizza. >> i take big offense because chicago style deep dish is the best. >> picking on our pizza. >> a ribbing. >> take a bite it's irresistible. >> i'm not a deep dish fan, myself. i love thin crust. i could get hate mail. i used to ship it froze ton california. >> i'm not a deep dish fan. >> jon: get to the traffic and weather al
, whose final mission ended more than 40 years ago. i'm neil cavuto reporting from the kennedy space center visitor complex in florida. it is hard for people my age to believe that most americans weren't even alive the last time a man walked on the moon. apollo 17 astronaut gene cernan on december 14th, 1972. a number of the explorers who made the trip have passed away. the rest are now in their late 70s, some 80s, but the story they tell still sounds like something out of the future, not the past. it's a story about how america, with a combination of vision, high-techno-how, and good old-fashioned courage answered the challenge of arrival, stepped into the unknown and achieved what almost seems as unbelievable today as it was a half century ago. ♪ it was october 4th, 1957, at the height of the cold war that the soviets launched a beachball-sized satellite named sputnik, which orbited the earth in just over an hour and a half. >> they tell us the world may never be the same again. >> in 1957, whether i was still in flight school, sputnik was launched. that's the beginning of the sp
a long term agreement. >> i firmly believe what president kennedy said, let us never negotiate out of fear but let us never fear to negotiate. i believe that. this has brought us the progress that was achieved this weekend. for the first time in a decade we have halted the progress on iran's nuclear program. key parts of the program will be rolled back. [ applause ] >> today the "new york times" reports that the obama administration and secretary of state john kerry have been having secret communications for several months and that the three decade communication stalemate was ended when senator john kerry began sending messages through the sultan. it was set exactly what the iranians needed to hear. he thinks this is a terrible deal. >> what was concluded in geneva last night is not an historic agreement, it's an historic mistake. like the agreement with north korea in 2005, this agreement has made the world a much more dangerous place. >> imagine if you will what the reaction would be if the israeli prime minister had welcomed the deal. iranians would have been forced to instantly
. kennedy. >> the 1960's were different. [laughter] there were a lot of things happening involving race, the breakdown, the structure of society. i was suddenly out of the seminary and in new england. there were no rules. things were falling apart without structure. i was fortunate to be at holy cross. i was fortunate with the structure that the nuns had given me. i was fortunate. i had been in predominantly white schools. i was the only black kid in my high school and savannah. the transition to a school with very few blacks in a difficult set of circumstances, i had a jumpstart. i was ahead of the game. i had something. it allowed me to continue to do well, even though it was difficult. >> later today, here from two supreme court justices. clarence thomasson 9:00 p.m., followed by elena kagan at 9:45 p.m. c- days of book tv on span2. on c-span3, the 150th anniversary of the gettysburg address. james mcpherson helps commemorate the dedication at gettysburg. at 4:00 and 10:00 p.m.. >> yesterday the president pardoned two turkeys at the white house. here is more from that event now. >> 8
jackie? >> absolutely fascinated by jacqueline kennedy onassis. absolutely fascinated by. there had already been 43 books written on her but i interviewed a lot of people close to the family, close to mrs. onassis, which she was at the time that i wrote it. and i really believe in writing what i call an unauthorized biography. now unauthorized does not mean untrue, it means you're doing it without the subject's cooperation or approval. >> would you like to do it with the subject's cooperation? >> no. >> really? >> because -- >> yeah? >> because -- you give up editorial control. so if you are writing about jacqueline kennedy onassis, of course i was -- i wouldn't be able to talk about the president's womanizing, or the things that really affected their marriage. primarily not so much the womanizing although she did know about it and she tolerated it, it was the awful health problems that dogged jfk for so much of his life. i don't think anybody really realizes all the sicknesses, all the botched surgeries, all the awful diagnoses that he had. and that really was a better. and she wou
for a good biography. >> kitty her book capturing camelot. has iconic images of the kennedys. >> it's a departure of those it feet yourfeatures jfk kitty kels us from washington, d.c. your first major tell all was jackie. >> that's right. why lead you down this road and why choose jackie? >> i have been absolutely fascinated by jackie kennedy. >> i didn't think it was possible to write a biography about her that would be news worthy. because th at the time i tried o do it there was 43 books written on her. i infe interviewed a lot of peoe close to the family and close to mrs. onassis which she was at the time i wrote it. i believe writing an unauthorized biography. unauthorized does not mean untrue. it means you are doing it without the subject's cooperation or approval. would you like to do one with the subject's cooperation? >> no. >> really. >> because you give up editorial control. , if you arso if you are writint jacqueline kennedy onassis, of course i wouldn't be able to talk about the president's womanizing or the things that really affected their marriage. primarily not so m
with the way that kennedy has been portrayed since, you would think that he was politically social, but he was actually a pragmatic kind of player, moved the ball forward, this might work, and something that would appeal to both sides. >> not only that, but appeal to the average american household at this very moment. everybody watching the show and probably in the last few years had to clean up their own balance sheet. >> not here, other shows, maybe. >> all higher taxes mean more money, less spending and it's pretty common sense stuff. most people get it. why politicians don't, i don't know. >> the first reagan democrat was kennedy. obviously he was not in office long enough to get the full effect of it, but that's ronald reagan right there. >> two things happened after kennedy and johnson's administration. the great society of vietnam, they were very expense. we'll never know how president kennedy would have handled those two situations. he very likely would have done similar things johnson did. >> that's a really interesting question. i don't know. i mean, i want to say no, but -- >> w
possible? >> the kennedy assassination. it has been 50 years. harry reid was mad as hell and he was not going to take it anymore. the senate majority leader pushed a button on the nuclear option. that is ma called for a vote to change senate rules by a simple majority vote. joined republicans to join the move. reid said republicans forced his hand after what he called unprecedented use of the filibuster on three of president obama's nominees to the ac circuit court of appeals. the move short-circuits filibusters on most presidential nominees except for those from the u.s. supreme court. >> most important and most dangerous restructuring since thomas jefferson wrote them. >> enough is enough. they american pupils as ness is too important to keep falling prey day after day to washington politics. >> we are approaching a slippery slope that will destroy the very unique aspect of this institution called the united states senate. >> i'm wondering if senator mccain has a point. will the senate begin to resemble the house? rex it will. you will see a marked increase in partisanship. fi
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